(920) 967-1000

333 N. Commercial Street, Suite 100
Neenah, WI  54956

Radiology Associates of the Fox Valley

CANCER SERVICES

​VASCULAR ACCESS PROCEDURES



Vascular Access procedures including Mediport and other Central Venous Catheter Placement
The treatment of cancer unfortunately often involves repeated needle or catheter access to veins. Interventional oncologists are therefore often called upon to place catheters or ports into veins for more durable long term venous access. These procedures are minimally invasive and use the most current imaging technology to minimize patient discomfort and increase accuracy. Once placed, these catheters help avoid frequent venous needle access that many cancer patients would otherwise have to undergo. Below are examples of some of the more commonly placed venous access catheters in cancer patients.

Subcutaneous Mediport
Cancer patients unfortunately are often subject to frequent blood draws for laboratory testing and to intravenous administration of medications. These frequent intravenous needle pokes can be painful and annoying. One potential solution to this is placement of a subcutaneous mediport.

A mediport is a small reservoir covered with a rubber or silicone disk which is placed into a small pocket on the patients’ upper chest or arm. A thin catheter is attached to this reservoir and tunnels under the skin entering a vein and continuing centrally into a larger vein in the chest. The disk covering the reservoir can then be accessed easily for lab draw or medication administration saving the patient pain, time, and frustration.

RAFV interventional oncologists are experts at mediport placement and place them using ultrasound and x-ray guidance. We use moderate sedation and almost all patients are able to go home the same day.

Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC)
Cancer patients unfortunately are often subject to frequent blood draws for laboratory testing and to intravenous administration of medications. These frequent intravenous needle pokes can be painful and annoying. One potential solution to this is placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC).

A PICC line is a thin catheter that is inserted into an arm (peripheral) vein that then travels through the venous system with the tip ending in a larger central vein. Hence the name, peripherally inserted central catheter. The small end of the catheter which remains exposed in the arm can then be accessed easily for lab draw or medication administration saving the patient pain, time, and frustration.

RAFV interventional oncologists are experts at PICC line placement and place them using ultrasound and x-ray guidance. The placement is only slightly more involved than placing an IV. We use local anesthesia and patients are able to go home the same day.